Urbanization and Disease Emergence: Dynamics at the Wildlife–Livestock–Human Interface

Urbanization and Disease Emergence: Dynamics at the Wildlife–Livestock–Human Interface

An excellent recent review by Hasselle et al., (2016) argues that understanding the form and function of the wildlife-livestock-human interfaces could provide clues on how to mitigate risks of disease emergence.

That shifting focus from the pathogen to the processes underlying emergence and also from single pathogen studies to multi-pathogen studies might facilitate rapid detection of pathogen emergence.

They further point out that anthropogenic influence on ecological systems dictate the level of risk of zoonotic disease emergence as compared to wildlife and domestic animal reservoirs.

From these findings we could certainly conclude that urbanization, especially in developing countries, could be propagating disease emergence especially where we have such intimate wildlife-livestock-human interfaces. Further probing for establishment of “One Health” surveillance systems.

Access the full paper here: 

Hassell, J. M., Begon, M., Ward, M. J., & Fèvre, E. M. (2016). Urbanization and Disease Emergence: Dynamics at the Wildlife–Livestock–Human Interface. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. doi:10.1016/j.tree.2016.09.012

landscapes

How different interfaces interact and drivers propagate disease emergence; Image source: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.09.012

7

Subscribe to receive updates

Follow me on Twitter

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

I am a Veterinarian & a part time web designer. My current research is focused on the evidence-based added value & evaluation of One Health.

Verified Services

View Full Profile →

Kenyan agricultural economist, wins the 2016 Norman Borlang award

Kenyan agricultural economist, wins the 2016 Norman Borlang award

Kenyan agricultural economist, Dr. Mude Andrew has been named the 2016 winner of the Norman Borlang award for his work in developing livestock insurance programme for communities in remote and arid lands.

Mude and his team developed an index based livestock insurance on 2008 which uses satellites to foretell droughts and pay the insured farmers long before the animal is lost.

Dr. Andrew Mude (right) during a press conference

Dr. Andrew Mude (right) during a press conference

The State Department of Livestock has adopted the system and is piloting it in Wajir and Turkana Counties. So far, nearly 20, 000 households have benefitted from Dr. Mude’s index based insurance. Last week, 290 herders received payment worth Kshs.  3,000,000 after the satellites showed a decline of forage material.

Dr. Mude is currently based at the International Livestock Research Institute and he is the second Kenyan to receive the $10,000 Norman Borlang award for field research and application.  In 2013 Dr. Charity Mutegi and the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation (KARO) won the award for her work on combating aflatoxin.

Mude will formally receive the award on 12th October, 2016 in USA.

Dr. Mude said, “From data available from satellites which gives very accurate readings on the amount of green forage available, and that green is closely related to the health of livestock. And we can use a range of mdoels to e able to use this data to create what is called an index. So any particular area that suffers from shortfalls or deficiencies of forage which can be captured by satellites that would trigger a payment

This post is a transcription of the NTV news posted online on 30th August, 2016 and available at: http://ntv.nation.co.ke/news/national/2725528-3363638-ihbsrlz/index.html

7

Subscribe to receive updates

Follow me on Twitter

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

I am a Veterinarian & a part time web designer. My current research is focused on the evidence-based added value & evaluation of One Health.

Verified Services

View Full Profile →

Bad news for bats: Lethal white-nose fungus is now in the Pacific Northwest

Bad news for bats: Lethal white-nose fungus is now in the Pacific Northwest

image

Sad news out of Washington this weekend for the Conservation Medicine world!

Lethal white-nose fungus affecting bats is now in the Pacific Northwest → this has a huge negative implication for farmers. Why?

“In a single summer, a colony of 150 brown bats can eat enough adult cucumber beetles to prevent the laying of eggs that result in 33 million rootworm larvae, according to a study cited by Bat Conservation International. Without bats, insects would be free to ravage farm crops and trees, among other things. Their value to U.S. farmers has been estimated at $3 billion a year.”

Read more here→ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/04/01/bad-news-for-bats-lethal-white-nose-fungus-is-now-in-the-pacific-nw/

Subscribe to receive updates

Follow me on Twitter

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

I am a Veterinarian & a part time web designer. My current research is focused on the evidence-based added value & evaluation of One Health.

Verified Services

View Full Profile →

What’s your workplace thinking style?

What’s your workplace thinking style?

What's your workplace thinking style

Image: REUTERS/Lisi Niesner

Knowing which type of thinker you are can be a useful tool

Are you an optimizer or a connector? An explorer or an expert?

Pinpointing exactly what type of thinker you are could help not only you, but your entire organization, argue two experts in an article for Harvard Business Review. Most organizations use a standard set of tools to form, manage and motivate teams. However, they often overlook how people think.

“Today’s marketplace, the smartest companies aren’t those that necessarily out-produce the competition. Instead, it’s the organizations that outthink them,” Mark Bonchek and Elisa Steele write.

Why does it matter?

The authors highlight research that shows effective collective thinking has a major influence on performance. However, while it’s (normally) clear what our colleagues are doing, how they think is much harder to define.

They argue, by understanding how you and the rest of the team is thinking, we could all be more energized, more creative, more productive and make better decisions.

To help us, the authors have created a three-step process for defining how you and your team think.

So how do you think?

Step number one: Where does your thinking focus? Do you zero in on the idea, the process, the action, or relationships? It’s not about picking one over another, it’s about where you naturally focus.

Step number two: Where does your thinking orient? Towards the big picture or the detail?

Step number three: Combine these using the chart below to see your thinking style.

What's your workplace thinking style2

The authors define each style as follows:

· Explorer thinking is about generating creative ideas.

· Planner thinking is about designing effective systems.

· Energizer thinking is about mobilizing people into action.

· Connector thinking is about building and strengthening relationships.

· Expert thinking is about achieving objectivity and insight.

· Optimizer thinking is about improving productivity and efficiency.

· Producer thinking is about achieving completion and momentum.

· Coach thinking is about cultivating people and potential.

Once you know your style, it’ll become clear what gets you out of bed in the morning, what challenges you and how you can improve.

You and your team can then share your styles. “In this way, your thinking style becomes a useful tool – a kind of social currency – for the team,” they argue. From here you can build more effective, collaborative teams, who make better decisions – for both themselves individually, and also the company.

They conclude that businesses need to incorporate thinking into their team forming, motivation and management.

Certainly something to think about.

This article originally appeared on the World Economic Forum website on 11th March, 2016, authored by Joe Myers. Available at: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/03/whats-your-workplace-thinking-style?

Subscribe to receive updates

Follow me on Twitter

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

Dr. Kelvin Momanyi

I am a Veterinarian & a part time web designer. My current research is focused on the evidence-based added value & evaluation of One Health.

Verified Services

View Full Profile →

Pin It on Pinterest